The Pursuit of Happiness

Did you know that the average American home is now more than twice the size of a home from the 1950’s? But the average American family is smaller than it was in those days.

Did you know that the average American income is higher than it was in the 1950’s, even when you account for inflation? In 1950, the average American had less than $2,000 in total personal debt. Today’s average is $10,168, not including mortgages.

Despite the fact that we enjoy the highest standard of living on the planet, the best technology, and incredible access to opportunities, “it has been over fifty years since Americans described themselves to pollsters as very happy.” (See David Myers, The American Paradox)

Hear me well: I’m not asking to go back to the good ol’ days. Solomon said not to ask that question (Ecclesiastes 7:10). Here’s what I am asking: what has gone wrong? Why are we unsatisfied?

Perhaps, in our pursuit of happiness, we have traded the things that bring us real meaning for things that are hollow. Only after we bite into the promises of our culture do we find out that they are empty and unsatisfying. The antidote is simple: focus on the simple things that matter most. Invest in your faith, your family, and your friends. All the other stuff is just stuff.