Self-Centered Resolutions?

James Hinkle likes to say that the biggest room in anyone’s home is the room for improvement. He’s absolutely correct, and this is the time of year when we think about what we need to improve and how we might work on that. We make our resolutions to spend less, save more, eat less, exercise more, worry less, and pray more—and those are great resolutions. We need to take care of ourselves.

Here’s the thing, though: nobody is going to stand around your casket one day and say, “Man, aren’t you glad he lost those 5 pounds?” “Isn’t that awesome? He had a lot extra to retire on!”

What they will remember is how you treated them, your acts of kindness or your acts of cruelty.

I’m not suggesting that we don’t need to work on self-improvement—all of us do. If our poor self-care leads to an untimely end and puts a burden on others, our loved ones will remember and regret that.

What I am suggesting is, that if you really want to improve yourself, improve yourself in a way that improves others.

If you want to spend less and save more—do it so that you can be more generous with others.

If you want to get in better physical shape—do it so that you can be more present in the lives of your kids and grandkids and serve better in the kingdom.

If you want to worry less and pray more, do it so you can free energy and space to help other people carry their burdens.

We won’t be remembered for being a little better with our money or our health, but we’ll never be forgotten for being kinder and more present for the people around us. If you want to make a difference, make that your resolution for 2019.

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